Man Spends Four Years Growing A Beautiful Church Made Of Trees

Barry Cox has been passionate about the design and architecture of churches all his life, so he set out to build or more accurately, grow a one-of-a-kind church in his backyard in New Zealand.

I walked out my back door one day and thought, that space needs a church. And so it began, he said.

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Tree Church

Cox, the tree architect behind Treelocations, specializes in transporting living trees using a specially-designed tree spade. And it is this expertise that placed him in a prime position to realize such an ambitious project.

People know how much I love trees, so they call me when there are trees that would otherwise be cut-down or removed. I go and kind of rescue them.

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New Zealand Gardener

I cleared the area in April 2011 and made the iron frame, drawing on all the research I had done over the years of studying churches. I wanted the roof and the walls to be distinctly different, to highlight the proportions, just like masonry churches, he said.

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Tree Church

For the roof, he chose to use the very flexible cut-leaf alder because it can be easily trained to hew to the temporary iron frame. Its foliage is also sparse enough to let plenty of natural light in to illuminate the church and give the grass floor plenty of sunlight.

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Tree Church

For the walls, Cox used an Australian tea tree known as Copper Sheen, noted for its stone-like color. Because it is thick and textured, Cox trims it every six weeks to keep it looking like actual walls.

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Tree Church

As a final touch, Cox included the rambling Dublin Bay rose for a touch of romance and color. It weaves its way to the top and blooms from October to June.

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Tree Church

The church is also bordered with Camellia Black Tie, a dense hedging plant that requires little maintenance. And right on the gateway to the church are two perfectly proportioned Globosums standing sentry on either side.

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Tree Church

A double-lined avenue of Himalayan birch also leads to a labyrinth lined with mondo grass, inspired by the ancient city of Jericho.

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Tree Church

After four years of painstaking work, Cox officially opened the Tree Church to the public last January. Initially he wanted to keep it private, but eventually gave in to appeals from his family and friends. Since then, the Tree Church has become a very popular yet one-of-a-kind venue for weddings.

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Tree Church

Truly, it looks like the perfect spot for happy endings, and happy beginnings.

Source

Pulptastic